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Social Media Speaking Gig

Here are some of the details of my upcoming seminar/speaking thing. The basic gist is trying to outline the core differences b/w traditional and engagement marketing and then giving some good examples and strategies around both.

About Social Media
What exactly is Social Media? Social Media is media that users can easily participate in and contribute to, like blogs, message boards, forums, wikis and social networks. It’s dynamic and flexible, thrives on the notion of making connections and brings with it the power of every user on the planet. As marketers, we are used to carefully crafting and honing our key messages and measuring results. Social media turns that scenario upside down. Control is shared by all users, and feedback is immediate.

There’s a lot of buzz surrounding social networks these days and companies have been quick to get in on the action by establishing profiles on these web sites to promote their products and services. Online social networks attract millions of users a day and visits to these sites are up 14% from the year before.

The online health industry is also growing rapidly. Internet giants like Microsoft have put resources toward online medical records. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota has entered the world of social media with The Health Care Scoop (www.thehealthcarescoop.com), with the tagline “Patient reviews from people like you.” HealthCentral, an online destination for medical information, links people with a particular disease to relevant doctors and blogger-patients. Revolution Health, founded by former AOL chairman Steve Case, aims to be a one-stop shop for health and well-being. It offers a variety of online tools and resources as well as CarePages, online support communities created by patients and caregivers. Services like Angie’s List and Zagat are providing opportunities for consumers to rate their physician and healthcare experiences online.

About The Work Session
Tapping the Power of Social Media to Advance Your Brand Agenda

In this virtual session, we will explore the rise of social media and social marketing. Marc will share information about how businesses and organizations are tapping into this powerful resource, its impact, and how we can get involved.

Key questions to consider as you prepare for the session include:
-How are organizations approaching social media and social marketing?
-How can you connect with and build relationships with consumers receptive to your messages?
-How do you create high levels of engagement, gain good customer insights and feedback?
-What types of tools are involved and which best meet your business objectives?
-How do you build your brandstream? (i.e. a consistent flow of content created by a brand)
-How do you deliver value and measure the effort?
-How can you use new media in combination with traditional marketing techniques to build your brand?
-How do you help your organization move from web 1.0 to web 2.0 (interactive content; engaging consumers in content creation and social interaction)?

The prospects of social media and social marketing for healthcare are compelling for us as marketing leaders, for our organizations and for health care as an industry.

Meet our Catalyst:
In his role as Lead Social Networking Strategist for Microsoft, Marc Sirkin focuses on building business-to-business communities in the Enterprise Marketing Groups. Since 2001, Sirkin has held executive and senior level marketing roles focusing on helping large international organizations benefit from digital marketing. His experience includes leading eMarketing efforts for The Lymphoma and Leukemia Society and the March of Dimes. Marc is a regular blogger and speaker at conferences that include the Word of Mouth Marketing Association, the Direct Marketing Association, and the Nonprofit Technology Network.

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