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Straight Line Thinking

I'm not sure how coherent these thoughts are but here goes.

You know the saying that "the fastest path between two points is a straight line" right? For some reason, probably because of how busy I am, I keep thinking about this saying - or is it just a saying? Maybe it is a philosophy of life!

I was talking to a co-worker this morning who has a long commute - she takes a round about route to get to work because there is less traffic. Personally, I've resisted trying this route because I subscribe to the above mentioned "straight line philosophy." I go less miles, but in the same amount of time (approximately) and go in a much more direct route.

This of course, got me to thinking. Do I really believe that the right way to live is in a straight line? How far can I push this thinking?

As I was killing brain cells (and time) thinking about this, I thought of an example and a litmus test. Do you think that walking the bases loaded with 2 out to get to the next batter is a good strategy or not?

Personally, while I admit that sometimes that sort of thinking works, I'd almost always rather pitch to the guy at the plate rather than walk him.

My tendencies are to walk the straight path - but to fantasize about the winding road. I didn't take the opportunity to study abroad, or live like a hobo for a year out of college - I got a job. I don't wear crazy clothes and have never bleached my hair for no reason. I don't sing karaoke (in public anyway) and people often are surprised at how goofy I really am.

I don't think living the straight line life is bad, but am starting to think that it may be a bit narrow.


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Random straight line above.

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